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Navy-Marine Corps Memorial All-Stadium Quarterbacks, Running Backs and Wide Receivers Named

Sept. 27, 2009

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - Naval Academy Director of Athletics Chet Gladchuk announced today that Kaipo-Noa Kaheaku-Enhada (2005-08), Chris McCoy (1994-97) and Roger Staubach (1961-64) have been named to the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial All-Stadium Team as quarterbacks; Joe Bellino (1957-60), Reggie Campbell (2004-07), Cleveland Cooper (1971-74), Napoleon McCallum (1981-85) and Eddie Meyers (1978-81) have been named to the All-Stadium Team as running backs; and Bert Calland (1970-73), Greg Mather (1958-61), Phil McConkey (1975-78) and Rob Taylor (1964-67) have been named to the All-Stadium Team as wide receivers.


Kaipo-Noa
Kaheaku-Enhada

Chris McCoy

Roger Staubach

Joe Bellino

Reggie Campbell

Cleveland Cooper

Napoleon McCallum

Eddie Meyers

Bert Calland

Greg Mather

Phil McConkey

Rob Taylor

The team was selected as part of the 50th anniversary celebration of Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium.

The 12 players were selected by fan balloting that was conducted on navysports.com (50 percent of the vote) and by a committee (50 percent of the vote) made up of Navy Sports Information Director Scott Strasemeier, Navy football historian Jack Clary, former Annapolis Capital Sports Editor and Navy beat writer Joe Gross, current Navy beat writer for the Annapolis Capital Bill Wagner, Navy broadcasters Bob Socci and Pete Medhurst and Navy football historian and former beat writer for the Washington Post Christian Swezey.

Kaheaku-Enhada earned four varsity letters (2005, '06, '07, `08) and directed the Midshipmen to the 2006 Meineke Car Care Bowl, the 2007 Poinsettia Bowl and the 2008 EagleBank Bowl, as well as three-consecutive Commander-In-Chief's Trophies. Kaheaku-Enhada, who led Navy to three-straight NCAA rushing titles, is the only quarterback in school history to start in three victories over Army and is one of only two quarterbacks (joining Roger Staubach) to beat Notre Dame in the last 45 years. His 26-career rushing touchdowns are the fourth most in school history, while his streak of scoring a rushing touchdown in eight-consecutive games is the second-longest streak in program history. Kaheaku-Enhada was also an effective passer, tossing just seven interceptions in 182 career attempts (the second-lowest interception percentage in school history), while his career average of 17.1 yards per pass completion is the best mark in school annals.

McCoy earned varsity letters in 1995, `96 and `97 and led Navy to a victory over California in the 1996 Aloha Bowl where he completed nine out of 13 passes for 277 yards and was named the MVP. McCoy came to Navy as a defensive back, but was switched to quarterback as a sophomore by then-offensive coordinator Paul Johnson. In his first-career start at quarterback, McCoy rushed for an amazing 273 yards on 26 attempts against SMU. The 273 yards remains an NCAA record for rushing yards by a player making his first-career start. McCoy is Navy's second all-time leading rusher for a season (1,370 yards in 1997, fifth all-time in NCAA history for a quarterback) and a career (3,401 yards, eighth all-time in NCAA history for a quarterback). His 20 rushing touchdowns in 1997 were an NCAA record for a quarterback for more than a decade, while his 43-career rushing touchdowns are a school record. McCoy also holds the school record for total offense (5,887 yards) and for most games rushing for 200 yards or more (five). He was named the Most Valuable Player of the 1997 Blue-Gray All-Star Game and won the Naval Academy Athletic Association's Sword for Men.

Staubach earned varsity letters in 1962, `63 and `64 and is considered by many to be one of the greatest players in college football history. As a junior in 1963, Staubach became the second Naval Academy football player to win the Heisman Trophy as he led Navy to a national ranking of No. 2 and a berth in the Cotton Bowl against No. 1 Texas, where he set bowl records for pass completions (21 of 31) and yards passing (228). The Midshipmen posted wins over West Virginia, Michigan, Notre Dame and Maryland that season as he completed 106 passes in 161 attempts for 1,474 yards, while earning consensus All-America honors, as well as the Maxwell Trophy and Walter Camp Memorial Trophy. At one time, Staubach, who was hampered by injuries in his senior season, had set 28 Naval Academy records. Staubach was a three-time recipient of the Thompson Trophy (Presented to the midshipmen that did the most during the year for promotion of athletics at the Naval Academy) and was the 1965 winner of the Naval Academy Athletic Association Sword (presented to the midshipmen of the graduating class that has personally excelled in athletics during his years of varsity competition). He was the first sophomore to win the Thompson Trophy and is the only three-time winner in the history of the award. Staubach, whose No. 12 jersey was retired, was inducted into the National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame in 1981. The football locker room in Ricketts Hall was named in his honor in 1996 and in 2008, Staubach received the National Football Foundation's Gold Medal, the highest honor one can receive from that organization. Additionally, he was named to the Walter Camp All-Century Team.

Bellino earned varsity letters in 1958, `59 and `60 and led the Midshipmen to the 1961 Orange Bowl against Missouri. In 1960, Bellino became the first Naval Academy player to win the Heisman Trophy. In just three seasons, Bellino scored 31 touchdowns, rushed for 1,664 yards on 330 carries, returned 38 kicks for 833 yards and set 15 Naval Academy records. Bellino was a unanimous All-America selection at halfback in 1960 and was also the winner of the Maxwell Award. His end zone interception preserved Navy's 17-12 win over Army that season. The Midshipmen were ranked as a high as fourth in the country and went on to play in the Orange Bowl. Bellino capped off his senior year (1960-61) at the Academy by winning the school's top two athletic awards, the Thompson Trophy and the Naval Academy Athletic Association Sword. Bellino's No. 27 jersey was retired by the Academy and he was a 1977 inductee into the National Football Foundation and College Football Hall of Fame. The Bellino Auditorium in Ricketts Hall is named after this outstanding athlete.

Campbell earned varsity letters in 2004, `05, `06 and `07, leading Navy to four-straight bowl games, including victories over New Mexico in the 2004 Emerald Bowl and Colorado State in the 2005 Poinsettia Bowl (where he was named MVP), four-straight Commander-In-Chief's Trophies and three-consecutive rushing titles. Campbell averaged 7.7 yards per carry in his career, the fourth-best average in school history, while his 1,905-career kickoff return yards are a school record. Campbell scored a Navy bowl-record five touchdowns against Colorado State in the 2005 Poinsettia Bowl, while returning a school-record two kickoffs for touchdowns in 2007. Campbell finished his career with 4,737 all-purpose yards (1,790 rushing yards, 830 receiving yards, 1,905 kickoff return yards and 212 punt return yards), the second most in school history, while his 2,019 all-purpose yards in 2007 rank as the third most in school history. Campbell also finished his career with eight touchdown receptions, tied for the fourth most in school history.

Cooper earned varsity letters in 1972, `73 and `74 and finished his career as the sixth-leading rusher in school history with 2,582 yards. He averaged 4.5 yards per carry in his career and his 17 rushing touchdowns rank as the sixth most in school history. He had six 100-yard rushing games in 1974, tied for the sixth most in program history, while his 12-career 100-yard rushing days ranks fifth. Cooper won the Thompson Trophy as a junior as he led Navy to the Commander-In-Chief's Trophy with victories over Air Force and Army.

McCallum earned varsity letters in 1981, `82, `83, `84 and `85 and helped lead Navy to the Commander-In-Chief's Trophy and Liberty Bowl in 1981. When it comes to all-around performances on the football field, McCallum ranks among the best ever. His 7,172 career all-purpose yards was the NCAA Division I-A record for more than a decade. McCallum once held 26 school records and still holds the records for career rushing yards (4,179 yards), single-season rushing yards (1,587 yards), career punt return yards (858) and most 100-yard rushing games in a season (eight) and career (19). In 1983, he earned consensus First-Team All-America honors at running back and was the Eastern College Athletic Conference (ECAC) Division I-A Co-Player of the Year with Boston College's Doug Flutie. He led the nation in all-purpose running, with an average of 216.8 yards per game, setting an NCAA record. He also finished third in the country in rushing with an average of 144.3 yards per contest. In 1984, McCallum suffered a season-ending broken ankle in the fourth quarter of the second game of the season and was granted an additional year of eligibility because of the injury. In 1985, he again led the country in all-purpose running (211.8 yards per game) and was seventh in rushing (120.6), 10th in kickoff returns (24.4) and 14th in scoring (8.2). Again a First-Team All-American, he was Most Valuable Offensive Player for the gray squad in the annual Blue/Gray Game and the Most Valuable Player in the Senior Bowl. McCallum, whose No. 30 is retired, was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in 2003.

Meyers earned varsity letters in 1979, `80 and `81 and helped lead Navy to the 1980 Garden State Bowl and the 1981 Liberty Bowl, where he was named the MVP. Navy won the Commander-In-Chief's Trophy in 1979 and 1981 and retained it in 1980. Meyers had two of the greatest rushing days in school history, rushing for 298 yards (second most in school history) on 42 carries against Syracuse in 1981 and 278 yards (third most in school history) on 42 carries against Army in 1979. As a senior, Meyers rushed for 1,318 yards despite missing three games with a thigh injury and finished as the fifth leading rusher in the nation. He was named the Downtown Athletic Club College Football Player of the Year, the New Jersey College Football Player of the Year, won the Washington Touchdown Club Timmie Award, was named All-East, Honorable Mention All-American and participated in the Hula and Japan All-Star Games. He had 14-career 100-yard rushing days, the third most in school history, including a school-record tying eight 100-yard games in 1981. Meyers is the third all-time leading rusher in school history with 2,935 yards. He was the Naval Academy Athletic Association Sword as a senior.

Calland earned varsity letters in 1971, `72 and `73 and led Navy to the Commander-In-Chief's Trophy in 1973. Calland finished his career as Navy's second all-time leading receiver in catches with 108 for 1,273 yards. In 1972, Calland tied the single-season school record for catches with 61. He was named the team MVP and the winner of the Silver Helmet Award in 1973.

Mather earned varsity letters in 1959, `60 and `61 and earned First-Team All-America honors in '61. Mather, who was also an outstanding kicker and punter, played in the Coaches All-America Game, the College All-Stars vs. NFL Champions Game and the U.S. All-Star Game in Washington, D.C. In 1960, Mather was second only to Joe Bellino in points scored (41), while as a senior he caught 22 passes for 258 yards and led the team with 61 points. He won the Naval Academy Athletic Association Sword as a senior.

McConkey earned varsity letters in 1976, `77 and `78 and led Navy to the Commander-In-Chief's Trophy and a Holiday Bowl victory over BYU in 1978 where he was named the game's Most Valuable Player. McConkey is Navy's second all-time leading receiver in yardage gained with 1,278 yards on 67 catches. As a senior, he caught 22 passes for 532 yards and his 24.2 yards per catch that season stands as the fourth-best average in school history. McConkey caught a school-record tying six touchdown passes in 1978, while his 13-career touchdown catches are tied for the most in school history. McConkey was also an outstanding punt returner as his 80 career punt returns are a school record and his 736 career punt return yards stand second. McConkey won the Thompson Trophy in 1979.

Taylor earned varsity letters in 1965, `66 and `67 and is Navy's all-time leading receiver. Taylor owns school records for catches in a game (10 three times in 1967 against Penn State, William & Mary and Vanderbilt), catches in a season (tied with Bert Calland with 61), catches in a career (129), pass receiving yards in a game (179 against Vanderbilt in 1967), receiving yards in a season (818 in 1967, his 727 receiving yards in 1966 ranks second), receiving yards in a career (1,736), touchdowns catches in a season (tied with Phil McConkey among others with six) and touchdown receptions in a career (tied with McConkey with 13). His 16-yard touchdown catch with 57 seconds remaining lifted Navy to a 23-22 upset of Penn State in 1967. Taylor played in the Coaches All-American Game and the East-West Shrine Game.

 

 

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